Teleoftalmología para el cribado de la retinopatía diabéticaexperiencia de 8 años

  1. Alicia Cristina Pareja Ríos 1
  2. Sergio Bonaque 2
  3. Miguel Ángel Serrano García 1
  4. Francisco Cabrera López 3
  5. Pedro Abreu Reyes 4
  6. D. Marrero Saavedra 5
  1. 1 Hospital Universitario de Canarias
    info

    Hospital Universitario de Canarias

    San Cristóbal de La Laguna, España

    ROR https://ror.org/05qndj312

  2. 2 Universidad de La Laguna
    info

    Universidad de La Laguna

    San Cristobal de La Laguna, España

    ROR https://ror.org/01r9z8p25

  3. 3 Complejo Hospitalario Universitario Insular - Materno Infantil de Canarias
    info

    Complejo Hospitalario Universitario Insular - Materno Infantil de Canarias

    Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, España

    ROR https://ror.org/04cbm7s05

  4. 4 Hospital Universitario Nuestra Señora de Candelaria
    info

    Hospital Universitario Nuestra Señora de Candelaria

    Santa Cruz de Tenerife, España

    ROR https://ror.org/005a3p084

  5. 5 Hospital Universitario de Gran Canaria Dr. Negrín, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
Journal:
Archivos de la Sociedad Española de Oftalmologia

ISSN: 0365-6691

Year of publication: 2017

Volume: 92

Issue: 2

Pages: 63-70

Type: Article

DOI: 10.1016/j.oftal.2016.08.006 DIALNET GOOGLE SCHOLAR

Abstract

Purpose To describe the results of a diabetic retinopathy screening program implemented in a primary care area. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using data automatically collected since the program began on 1 January 2007 until 31 December 2015. Results The number of screened diabetic patients has progressively increased, from 7,173 patients in 2007 to 42,339 diabetic patients in 2015. Furthermore, the ability of family doctors to correctly interpret retinographies has improved, with the proportion of retinal images classified as normal having increased from 55% in 2007 to 68% at the end of the study period. The proportion of non-evaluable retinographies decreased to 7% in 2015, having peaked at 15% during the program. This was partly due to a change in the screening program policy that allowed the use of tropicamide. The number of severe cases detected has declined, from 14% with severe non-proliferative and proliferativediabetic retinopathy in the initial phase of the program to 3% in 2015. Conclusions Diabetic eye disease screening by tele-ophthalmology has shown to be a valuable method in a growing population of diabetics. It leads to a regular medical examination of patients, helps ease the workload of specialised care services and favours the early detection of treatable cases. However, the results of implementing a program of this type are not immediate, achieving only modest results in the early years of the project that have improved over subsequent years.