Inteligencia emocional y ajuste psicológico en estudiantes: nivel académico y rama de estudios

  1. Mónica Carballeira Abella
  2. Betsabé Marrero Carreira
  3. Desiré Abrante Rodríguez
Journal:
Universitas psychologica

ISSN: 1657-9267

Year of publication: 2019

Volume: 18

Issue: 4

Pages: 14

Type: Article

Export: RIS

Metrics

JCR (Journal Impact Factor)

  • Year 2019
  • Journal Impact Factor: 0.517
  • Best Quartile: Q4
  • Area: PSYCHOLOGY, MULTIDISCIPLINARY Quartile: Q4 Rank in area: 126/138 (Ranking edition: SSCI)

SCImago Journal Rank

  • Year 2019
  • SJR Journal Impact: 0.227
  • Best Quartile: Q3
  • Area: Psychology (miscellaneous) Quartile: Q3 Rank in area: 183/263
  • Area: Social Psychology Quartile: Q4 Rank in area: 217/300

CIRC

  • Social Sciences: B

CiteScore

  • Year 2019
  • CiteScore of the Journal : 0.7
  • Area: Psychology (all) Percentile: 24

Journal Citation Indicator (JCI)

  • Year 2019
  • Journal Citation Indicator (JCI): 0.16
  • Best Quartile: Q4
  • Area: PSYCHOLOGY, MULTIDISCIPLINARY Quartile: Q4 Rank in area: 131/135

Abstract

The main purpose has been to analyze the emotional intelligence -EI- in 147 adult students, from different academic levels: vocational students, undergraduate students and master’s degree students. The associations of the three EI scales -emotional attention, emotional clarity and emotional repair- with other variables, such as personality, self-esteem, social support and general symptomatology were analyzed. Emotional repair was the EI scale that stablished greater relationships, especially with conscientiousness, openness to experience, extraversion, self-esteem and social support. No differences were found in comparing the EI scores among the three academic levels -vocational students, undergraduate students and master’s degree students-. Some differences were found between those students with extreme scores in EI, on sociodemographic characteristics, self-esteem, social support and general symptomatology. Additionally, a contrast study considering the three scales of IE, self-esteem and social support, between a sample of Computer Engineering students and those participants from the original sample studying Social or Health Sciences, showed less social support and emotional attention among Computer Engineering students than Social or Health Sciences degrees. These findings give complementary information to the research carried out in this regard, in order to implement psychological interventions to promote emotional intelligence among students from different academic levels.