Informe del Comité Científico de la Agencia Española de Seguridad Alimentaria y Nutrición (AESAN) sobre el riesgo asociado al consumo de complementos alimenticios que contienen curcumina como ingrediente

  1. Magda Rafecas 1
  2. María Montaña Cámara Hurtado 2
  3. Álvaro Daschner 3
  4. Rosa Maria Giner Pons 4
  5. Francisco Jose Morales Navas 5
  6. María Puy Portillo Baquedano 6
  7. Carmen Rubio Armendáriz 7
  8. Maria José Ruiz Leal 4
  9. Pau Talens Oliag 8
  1. 1 Universitat de Barcelona
    info

    Universitat de Barcelona

    Barcelona, España

    ROR https://ror.org/021018s57

  2. 2 Universidad Complutense de Madrid
    info

    Universidad Complutense de Madrid

    Madrid, España

    ROR 02p0gd045

  3. 3 Instituto de Investigación del Hospital de La Princesa
    info

    Instituto de Investigación del Hospital de La Princesa

    Madrid, España

  4. 4 Universitat de València
    info

    Universitat de València

    Valencia, España

    ROR https://ror.org/043nxc105

  5. 5 Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas
    info

    Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas

    Madrid, España

    ROR https://ror.org/02gfc7t72

  6. 6 Universidad del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea
    info

    Universidad del País Vasco/Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea

    Lejona, España

    ROR https://ror.org/000xsnr85

  7. 7 Universidad de La Laguna
    info

    Universidad de La Laguna

    San Cristobal de La Laguna, España

    ROR https://ror.org/01r9z8p25

  8. 8 Universidad Politécnica de Valencia
    info

    Universidad Politécnica de Valencia

    Valencia, España

    ROR https://ror.org/01460j859

Journal:
Revista del Comité Científico de la AESAN

ISSN: 1885-6586

Year of publication: 2020

Issue: 32

Pages: 85-112

Type: Article

Abstract

The root of the Curcuma longa L. botanical species contains certain active components called curcuminoids, with diarylheptanoid structures and consisting of curcumin and analogous compounds, mainly demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin. Curcumin is a food colouring additive approved for use within the European Union with the code E 100. It provides yellow colouring and is suitable for use in a large variety of products. In addition to its use as additive in many foods or its presence in dishes such as curry, currently turmeric, curcuminoids and curcumin are also used as ingredients in many food supplements sold within the European Union. In its re-evaluation of curcumin as a food additive (E 100), the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has set an admissible daily intake (ADI) of 210 mg/day in adults with a body weight of 70 kg. Having performed the risk assessment of the consumption of food supplements that contain curcumin as an ingredient, the AESAN Scientific Committee considers that the ADI established for curcumin as an additive is applicable to curcumin as an ingredient in a food supplement, but not to the sum of all curcuminoids, even though curcumin is the main component. Additionally, it notes that there is no available information on the lack of side effects in children under the age of 18, therefore it would not be desirable to provide food supplements containing curcumin to children under this age. Similarly, the safety of curcumin as an ingredient in food supplements for pregnant and lactating women has not been established. For this reason, it is not recommended as an ingredient in food supplements for pregnant and lactating women, as curcumin and its metabolites are transferred to infants by their mothers’ milk. It is also recommended that food supplement labels state the amount of curcumin present in their ingredients.